MississippiMississippi

Wills

Client Legal Education Materials

  • How Can I Revoke or Change My Will

    This document addresses the question of changing your Will. Circumstances change and keeping a will current with these life changes is important. Content Detail

    By:
    The Mississippi Bar
  • 2010 Medicare/Medicaid Manual

    This manual has been prepared as a useful guide to providers and consumers. It will assist you in learning about the health care programs available to Mississippi's elderly and disabled population. It will also provide you with a resource guide composed of various national and state agencies concerned with elder law, health care, and consumer protection. This manual is not intended, nor should it be used, as a substitute for medical, legal, or professional advice. Users of this guide should always consult with a doctor, attorney or other qualified professional before relying on the information contained in this publication. The directory listings in the "Resources" section of this manual are provided for your convenience and should not be construed as an endorsement by North Mississippi Rural Legal Services. Content Detail

  • Why You Need a Will

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    By:
    North Mississippi Rural Legal Services
  • FAQ About Power of Attorney

    A "power of attorney" is a written document in which you (the "principal") appoint someone else (called the "agent" or "attorney-in-fact") to act for you. Your agent can do any legal act you ask him or her to perform. Content Detail

    By:
    AARP
  • Living Wills

    A living will is a legal document in which patients instruct health-care providers about their wishes with respect to medical procedures should they become incapacitated. The living will and the durable medical power of attorney are two federally mandated parts of what is known as advanced medical directives. Content Detail

    By:
    AARP
  • Where There's a Will, There’s a Way

    Learn the importance of taking this important step. Content Detail

    By:
    The Mississippi Bar
  • Who Should Make Your Decisions When You Are Incapacitated?

    Illness, accident, or advanced age can render a person incapable of making decisions for himself. While you are healthy, deciding who can act on your behalf in those situations can give you the assurance that your wishes will be followed. Content Detail

    By:
    The Mississippi Bar